Employer

‘Are you sweet? Then keep scrolling’: Employer’s online rant raises eyebrows

Dough and Gabi Michael are looking for a new employee for their malting business and had a unique job offer to find the right candidate.

Dough and Gabi Michael are looking for a new employee for their malting business and had a unique job offer to find the right candidate.

It was a rant never meant to be made public when a frustrated farmer accidentally posted a tongue-in-cheek job advert that raised some eyebrows.

“Are you sweet?” the announcement started. “So keep scrolling somewhere else because this job probably isn’t for you!”

He went on to say, “If you don’t have a whole tribe of parasites (family members deprived of oxygen) feeding off your hard work, making you a depressing person, then you might just be lucky as our team let you join us.

The Seek advert for a factory operator at Gladfield Malt near Dunsandel in Canterbury doubled the ouch factor when listed last week, especially with what the job had to offer.

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“Well, the first thing is that you can cast to touch this PC, the double-standard, two-sided workplace that you’re currently working on (the one everyone tells you is the new normal),” said the ad, “and get back to work somewhere where you don’t have to apologize for waking up every morning.

With irony, Michael vented his frustration with the current job market.

With irony, Michael vented his frustration with the current job market.

Although the ad was later edited, Gladfield Malt farmer and co-owner Doug Michael explained that his ‘rant’ was in response to problems he had with hiring staff and that he was never meant to be seen.

Having caught the flu during a busy time on the farm, Michael and his wife Gabi had little time in their day to search for the right employee.

Trying to find a “resilient” employee who would last longer than a week has proven difficult with current labor market shortages, according to Michael.

So having to sift through over 200 auto-generated responses to an ad and interviewing a number of people who hadn’t prepared was not work he enjoyed.

Writing a joke job application, Michael expressed his feelings.

“It’s a family business,” he warned. “It is by no means a code name for ‘a day spa’.”

“It was a good way for me to calm down,” he laughed, recalling what happened next after he put off rewriting the ad for just a few days to find out his wife had accidentally posted the ad online without reading her husband’s harsh words. .

THINGS

New Zealand’s hospitality industry is struggling with a labor shortage that has been exacerbated by border closures and the departure of many migrant workers. (Video first published in July 2021)

“It was a bit upsetting for me,” Michael said. “It’s my fault…that’ll teach me!” »

Perhaps even more surprising was that the original ad attracted genuine candidates, although the offer of a free beer every night after work may have been the trigger.

Michael is not the only one struggling to find staff, with North Canterbury Federated Farmers chair Caroline Aymes saying dairy farms and agricultural contractors continue to face labor shortages.

”It’s always very difficult, and I know quite a few farms that have open roles.”

Recently, Nikko Asset Management’s head of equities, Stuart Williams, said Things that the shortage of employees in all industries was a crisis.

“I can’t think of a single industry that wouldn’t welcome more workers right now.”

Doug Michael says Gladfield Malt pays good money and has a great team, but staff shortages mean it's hard to find the right people to fill the roles.

Doug Michael says Gladfield Malt pays good money and has a great team, but staff shortages mean it’s hard to find the right people to fill the roles.

He said the labor shortage was permeating all sectors of the economy, limiting production, affecting services and driving up inflation as businesses were forced to pay more to attract and retain a workforce. limited pool of workers.

For Michael, the exodus of Kiwis overseas after being held back for two years by a pandemic made the situation worse, especially with countries like Australia where agricultural workers were being offered higher pay and housing. free.

“We pay a lot here, and we have a damn good team,” said the maltster.

“It was damn hard.”